Diagnostic Imaging

Radiology

Radiology (x-ray) is routinely used to provide valuable information about a pet’s bones, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, intestines, colon), respiratory tract (lungs), heart, and genitourinary system (bladder, prostate). It can be used alone or in conjunction with other diagnostic tools to provide a list of possible causes for a pet’s condition, identify the exact cause of a problem or rule out possible problems. Sedation is sometimes required in order to obtain a diagnostic x-ray.

When a pet is being radiographed, an x-ray beam passes through its body onto a radiographic film. Images on the film appear as various shades of gray and reflect the anatomy of the animal. Bones, which absorb more x-rays, appear as light gray structures. Soft tissues, such as the lungs, absorb fewer x-rays and appear as dark gray structures. Interpretation of radiographs requires great skill on the part of the veterinarian.

Some of the most dramatic examples of diagnostic x-rays are taken during the diagnosis of gastric foreign bodies. Click here to see example x-rays of patients who have ingested foreign bodies.

Ultrasound

Ultrasonography, Gelor ultrasound, is a diagnostic imaging technique similar to radiography (X-rays) and is usually used in conjunction with radiography and other diagnostic measures. It allows visualization of the deep structures of the body.

Ultrasound can be used for a variety of purposes including examination of the animal’s heart, kidneys, liver, gallbladder, bladder, etc. It can also be used to determine pregnancy and to monitor an ongoing pregnancy. Ultrasound can detect fluid, cysts, tumors or abscesses.

A ‘transducer’ (a small hand held tool) is applied to the surface of the body to which an ultrasound image is desired. The gel is used to help the transducer slide over the skin surface and create a more accurate visual image.

Sound waves are emitted from the transducer and directed into the body where they are bounced off the various organs to different degrees depending on the density of the tissues and amount of fluid present. The sounds are then fed back through the transducer and are relfected on a viewing monitor. Ultrasound is a painless procedure with no known side effects. It does not involve radiation.

Do you have questions about our diagnostic imaging options? We’re here to help! Complete the form below and a member of our team will get back to you as quickly as possible! You can also call us at 503-648-1643.